October 23, 2020

ilpuntontc

Just Do Travel

Hundreds object to proposed Pink Hotel redevelopment on Pendower beach

4 min read

More than 500 people have objected to plans to turn an old hotel and farmhouse in Cornwall into a boutique hotel, a new restaurant and residential apartments.

The run-down Pink Hotel site, on Pendower beach, has sat derelict for 13 years.

Earlier this year, Koha Architects submitted a planning application to turn it into a 14-bedroom boutique hotel, a new restaurant which during the day would operate as a café, 25 residential apartments with significant landscaping and public amenity improvements.

The project has met the opposition of many locals and visitors, who claim it is obtrusive and unrelated to local needs and that it would lead to the site being overdeveloped.

But the Penryn-based architects say the proposals have been shaped by more than two years of consultation and would bring new life, new visitor facilities and major environmental improvements to the site of the former ‘Pink Hotel’.

The company added that the vision is for a sympathetic mixed-use regeneration scheme while retaining the original farmhouse, which is the oldest building on the site, as a centrepiece to the development.

The former Pink Hotel

Signs at the site read: “We would like to improve your view… This regeneration of the old ‘Pink Hotel’ site will bring better access and facilities for visitors, new employment opportunities and significant environmental improvements.

“Bringing new life to this run-down site. The proposals benefit from design of the highest quality and wildlife-friendly features to complement and enhance Pendower’s unique surroundings.”

Signs promoting the regeneration scheme

So far, 533 objections from locals and visitors have been sent to Cornwall Council via the local authority’s planning portal. Ten messages of support have also been submitted.

Rob Walker wrote: “Please do not grant permission for the over development of this protected place. It is a beautiful area and the increase in traffic, overburden of infrastructure and saturation of the site with the proposed level of holiday accommodation would not be in keeping with the locality and lead to significant harm.

“The local roads and access are already poor and the site needs protection and is outside normal development boundaries. Small scale development of the current buildings is far more appropriate.”

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Ray Bell commented: “Inappropriate, obtrusive, unrelated to local need or local sensitivities as related to a place of outstanding natural beauty.

“Please listen to the overwhelming objections from local people and visitors and refuse this application.”

Adam Rogers added: “I am not in support of this build. If it offered a bar with a sea view open to locals, which there isn’t one in the area, or a swimming pool indoor for use of public as again there isn’t one in the local area unless you are over 55.

“It does not create enough local interest. Nor does it create enough local year round jobs.”

Pendower beach

Stuart Turner wrote: “I grew up in Cornwall and return many times to see the places I loved as a child. This proposal is totally out of keeping with the natural beauty of Pendower beach.

“A fragile ecology of rare plants, birds and marine life – protected by local, national and European law – faces an existential threat if a proposal to build homes next to the beach is approved.

“Please do the right thing for all of the people of Cornwall and decline this application.”

St Ewe Parish Council, Veryan Parish Council, St Merryn Parish Council, Ruan Lanihorne Parish Council, Philleigh Parish Council, Gerrans Parish Council all objected to the plans.

Cornwall Wildlife Trust wrote: “This application would result in the direct, avoidable loss of County Wildlife Site, so the Trust objects to this application.

“We work closely with Cornwall Council to guide better development for biodiversity in Cornwall so would be happy to discuss this site further with Cornwall Council if this project is revised and/or progressed”.

People who support the scheme, however, said the area desperately needs to be regenerated.

R. Stephens wrote: “We support the planning application for the long overdue revitalisation of Pendower Beach House Hotel site, which has been an eyesore for far too long. From two Cornish locals.”

Elspeth Tavaci commented: “I would like to add my support for Pendower planning application. Their use of locally sourced stone and slate and the low build structures fit perfectly with the environment. It looks beautiful and very tastefully and aesthetically done.”

Responding to concerns, Koha Architects said a key part of the project would see the stabilisation of the existing Rocky Lane access road to the beach, future-proofing it against coastal erosion.


Gary Wyatt, of the company, explained: “We fully appreciate the special character and nature of the location. We have listened to local opinion and worked hard to bring forward proposals which are appropriate, respectful and provide a significant opportunity to greatly enhance this sadly neglected site, bringing many environmental, ecological, access and other physical improvements which will benefit visitors and the local community.

“The consultation process has shown some real enthusiasm for the regeneration. It has also shown that some people support the principle of redevelopment but would prefer this was limited to providing a refurbished hotel only.


“However, it is the interdependence of the various elements of the scheme which makes possible the delivery of a successful and viable regeneration project.

“We believe the proposals strike the right balance in achieving a scheme which will improve access and facilities at Pendower Beach and support local tourism whilst providing local employment and income generation.”

Mr Wyatt confirmed the company is working with Cornwall Wildlife Trust with the aim of the scheme becoming the first in Cornwall to achieve ‘Building with Nature’ accreditation. He added that they are incorporating wildlife-friendly design and high-quality green infrastructure.